February 29, 2012

ON THE HUNT

Manuscript is searching for the country's best new menswear design talent. If you graduated in the past year with a men's-focused collection, we invite you to get in touch for a special project we are planning. Email manuscript@mitchelloakleysmith.com for more details or to recommend someone. 

February 28, 2012

CITY TO SURF

Sportswear meets surf wear meets suiting in our sartorial mash-up of colour and texture.


Top: Mr Stenmark wears RUSTY rash vest, ZEGNA SPORT pants, DION LEE neckpiece. 
ABOVE: BASSIKE shorts. 

LACOSTE shirt, CALIBRE suit, OAKLEY glasses, ZAMBESI belt.

WHYRED tank, LAB suit, KAREN WALKER glasses. 

WHYRED sweater, PAGEANT suit. 

ZAMBESI shirt. 

PRADA shirt. 

RUSTY surfboard, SUBFUSCO suit.

BODY SCIENCE compression skins, BURBERRY shoes & glasses, ICE watches.


WHYRED shirt, BRENT WILSON suit, REEBOK shoes. 

AUSSIEBUM & TRIXAN BODY swimmers, OAKLEY glasses, TRIWA watch.

JORDAN & ZAC STENMARK VIVIENS MODELS | DIGITAL OPERATION JEREMIAH WOLF
PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANCE JAMES BAILEY & MITCH FONG | POST PRODUCTION ALEX REZNICK

February 27, 2012

THINGS GET PERSONAL


British high street retailer Topshop - and its male counterpart Topman - has arrived with a bang in Melbourne, with Sydney to open shortly, and the service, as you would expect, is slick. Topman offers an in-house styling service, with personal shoppers available for booking to help advise on how to wear trends and what shapes and pieces suit your style. There's three services available, ranging from an express 30 minutes to a two-hour wardrobe overhaul, to help navigate the brand's vast offering. 

February 18, 2012

JACK OF ALL TRADES


Rigid theatre training and a blockbuster film release are secondary assets to the tireless work ethic of young actor Jack Derges, writes Mitchell Oakley Smith.

PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL SCALA | STYLING SONNY GROO
 GROOMING THOM TICKLEMOUSE | HAIR MITSUTAKA ENOKIDA

British actors are more believable than their American counterparts. Maybe it's that Shakespeare was British, giving birth to modern theatre as we know it. Or simply that Britain is home to the English language. It's not for this reason alone that we chose to profile young actor Jack Derges, but it certainly makes us believe his talent is real. 

It may not yet be the latter, considering the 23-year old has only just completed shooting what will be his second film to date - Passengers, alongside The Chronicles of Narnia's Anna Popplewell, due for release in March next year - but Mr Derges' talent is most certainly real, as is his determination. "No one can rise before dawn three hundred and sixty days a year fails to make his family rich", says Mr Derges in references to his work ethic. "With this in mind," he continues, "I will never be mistaken for an actor who takes things for granted." 

Mr Derges, 24, is the first in his family to perform for a living, but it's a passion that was encouraged, leading him to enrol in a performing arts course in Plymouth, the closest big city near his hometown of Devon, after which he moved to London to attend The Arts Educational School of Acting, scoring the lead role in the Gerry Lively-directed Dungeons & Dragons: The Book of Vile Darkness shortly after. 

"Filming was every boy's dream," says Mr Derges of the experience, a big one for the young actor, considering the most he'd performed was in college plays. "We were running around with swords and performing on horseback. It was an incredible experience." And although his performance in the franchise is yet to be seen, it could be said that Mr Derges' open, playful approach to acting, evidenced by his earlier work, allowed him to fully immerse himself in his character. 

TOP: Mr Derges wears BURBERRY PRORSUM jacket. 
ABOVE: BURBERRY sweater & pants. Mr Enokida uses MURDOCK LONDON
PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANCE RASMUS JENSEN | STYLING ASSISTANCE VICTOR ALEX CHEVAGNE 
 POST PRODUCTION POSTMEN | WITH THANKS MODELS1

February 17, 2012

THE WHITE SHIRT


The classic white dress shirt becomes the subject of considered discourse. 
WORDS TODD ROBINSON | PHOTOGRAPHY CHERINE FAHD

The classic white shirt is both an object and an ideal. Of the multitude of garments in the male wardrobe, none is as definitive as the white shirt. White comes first, then all others. Shirts of colour tend to be in some way only versions of the singular white. This inverted logic of difference means in order to distinguish a white shirt in any way we require some kind of method by which to do so. 

Distinction can begin by considering the shirt as a typology of forms, starting with the collar, which can spread, boned or soft, or buttoned down; the cuffs can be of a single band, turned-back, round or mitred, double or single buttoned; the fit full, narrow or shaped, and so on. Perhaps a more complete assessment might be possible through finely grained, lets say micro, perceptions. Only so much is discernible to the eye when faced with white on white. 

The artist Marcel Duchamp, an elegant man against the measure of any fashionable standard, proposed the beguiling term infra-mince. For Duchamp, infra-mince is the distance or interval between two things and is so compelling he is said to have dedicated ten years to its exploration. Despite leaving us to ponder such a notion with little in the way of explanation, he proffered a number of tantalising examples: the sound of corduroy rubbing together; the space between two sheets of paper; and the difference between a shirt, new then washed. I have always imagined this shirt as white. 

The architect Le Corbusier compared the white shirt to whitewashed walls, arguing these screens liberate a new, hitherto unseen modern body behind it. Paradoxically, when it comes to the white shirt, Duchamp's somewhat puzzling experiments bring us back to the sensuousness of the perceptible that Le Corbusier was so keen to dispose of. Tactile perception is most suited to bring out out the real promise of the white shirt: a pinch of cloth taken up between two fingers, the friction of the weave against the finger tips almost audible, attests to the sensation felt by the body in wearing. 

M.J. BALE cotton shirt.